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The robot revolution has begun and Captain America is without his trusty shield.

Ultron, the unreasonably angry artificial intelligence program, has taken over the form of some battered autonomous Iron Man suits and is using them to blast apart a late-night Avengers party in Stark Tower. Just before a few carefully placed blasts hit the all-American super-soldier, he kicks up a heel, knocks a marble table into the air and uses it to block the attack.

In real life, on the Shepperton Studios set outside London, Chris Evans looks like he’s playing an invisible game of hacky sack. The massive stone table will be digitally added later. (Even though the actor is in great shape, no human foot could casually flip such an object into the air.)

Avengers: Age of Ultron filmmaker Joss Whedon is advising the other heroes to scatter, while Cobie Smulders, playing former S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Maria Hill, dives to the floor just below Cap. Whedon is puzzling over the choreography here.

He jokes that the next shot in the movie will be Hill rising up with all the plates, food, and napkins from the tabletop stuck to her body.

While they sort it out so she doesn’t enter the firefight looking like she just finished a food fight, Evans has some time to talk …

Entertainment Weekly: In the first Avengers film, Cap was the outsider still trying to figure out where he belonged. This time, he’s the leader.

Chris Evans: I think he’s trying to be. I don’t think he’s aggressively barking orders at people, but I think when you have all these powers and abilities, someone needs to steer the ship. So I think that is what he’s trying to do.

EW: The Winter Soldier really upended things for him. His old friend is still alive, maybe still out there, maybe he’s good, maybe not. Is he still grappling with all that?

Evans: That’s the tricky part about these movies. You have to kind of suspend those plotlines temporarily and find reasons to say ‘Okay, we’ll get to that in just one movie. We’ll get right back to that.’ It’s hard to kind of say with too much logic why he’s kind of putting that on the back burner. But he’s addressing the matter at hand, and right now that’s Ultron.

EW: A hero has to multitask.

Evans: Well that’s just it. You need to give a little bit of a nod to it because if you ignore it, it’s insulting the audience’s intelligence. But at the same time, the audience almost has to respect movies: ‘Look, do you guys want this? If you want The Avengers, we have to accept the fact that there’s going to be splinters in our plotlines.’

EW: I feel like Cap is the noblest of all the characters. He’s the only one who knows what it’s like to be powerless. To be on the other side of fear.

Evans: He does have a healthy understanding of what it feels like to be powerless, to be the victim. But he also has a healthy understanding of what it is to be a soldier. I think anytime you meet anyone that’s been in the military, when you fight alongside someone they become a brother. I think in a weird way he looks at his Avengers as his family at this point.

EW: Is family what he wants? A bond with a fellow fighter?

Evans: It’s certainly what he wants, but Cap puts what he wants last. That’s his M.O. And I think for so long he just refuses to bleed on people. So it’s hard to explore a guy who doesn’t want to make waves with his own personal conflict. He’s always trying to help the greater good.

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I have added a few more high quality production stills from “Avengers: Age of Ultron” to the gallery!

The lead up to Avengers: Age of Ultron sounds like the busiest time in Chris Evans’ life. Portraying the Avengers’ noble, shield-throwing leader was the easy part: According to the star, a 14-hour day on Age of Ultron would result in a mere seven hours of actual work. But it’s the press tour—a non-stop global effort to remind audiences that Marvel remains the king of the summer movie season—that kicks his ass. Luckily, Evans is a solider. During a down moment at a fan event at New York City’s Samsung Galaxy Studio, we found the actor composed, amicable, and thirsty for lean fruit juice, which he chugged with a smile. If the guy has fatigue, he won’t show it until Avengers dominates America’s box office.

Which makes us wonder: Does it take a real life Steve Rogers to play Marvel’s screen version? To find out, we cross-checked Evans’ own life with Captain America’s defining characteristics.

Evans shares Steve’s moral compass: True

“You hope to see some Steve qualities in you. He does set the bar pretty high. Any time you make a movie where you’re living in a certain head space for an extended period of time, it’s tough not to take a little piece home with you. Sometimes that’s better than other times. If you’re gonna end up taking a piece of Steve home, that’s not the worst thing. It’s almost kinda like growing up with my father. Whenever there was conflict, whether it was between a buddy or a girlfriend, or professionally, you’d think, ‘What would my father do in this situation?’ In a strange, similar regard, you can kind of tell yourself, ‘What would Steve do in this situation?’, because his moral compass and his approach to conflict resolution, rooted in selflessness, is a pretty healthy place to start. I don’t even know if he has manners—he’s just a very selfless man. You know what I mean? He doesn’t complain, he puts himself last, he just does what’s needed of him.”

He lives by Cap’s no swearing rules: False

“I got a real bad potty mouth. I’m from Boston. That’s kind of a way of life back there. They’re a very expressive people.”

When he’s not in work mode, he’s reliving the good old days: True

“I’m soaked in nostalgia. I mean, I live in the past to a fault. You gotta stay [in the] present. The past is the past, but if you’re overanalyzing or trying to repeat it, you’re gonna get stuck. I just had a wonderful youth and I loved everything about it, so I really try and hang on to it. Growing up, I really liked Star Wars. Han Solo would’ve been really cool to meet. But my stuff was real low-brow. I was watching Bugs Bunny.”

He’s built to survive an impending attack: False

“I’ve never had to take a punch, luckily. Something tells me Steve could take it better than I could.”

Red, white, and blue are his favorite colors: True

“You know, it’s so unfortunate—[they’re] my three favorite colors to wear. A couple times, on accident, I’ll just get dressed for the day and I take one step out the door and I’m like, ‘Wait a minute. I can’t wear this. Wearing blue pants, a white shirt, and a red hat. This is a little ridiculous. I should probably go change.'”

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CHRIS EVANS (CAPTAIN AMERICA)

How do these films compare to when you’re the lead character?
It’s a lot more work. That’s really the only difference between the two films. It’s the same character and it’s usually the same group of people. Marvel did a great job of bringing back a lot of the same crew and even a lot of the same characters. Even the Captain America characters. The main difference is the workload. When you’re doing an Avengers movie you get a lot more days off, which is nice. When you’re doing a Captain America movie, you’re pretty much there every day.

Do you ever wish that Cap was not as nice as he is?
Of course. I mean, that’s what makes all characters interesting – their flaws, their concepts, their struggles. Cap is such a good man, a magnanimous man, a selfless man and, as a result, he carries a lot of that turmoil. You don’t always get to make mistakes and that’s an entertaining aspect of portraying the character, so yeah, I would love to see Captain America flawed. I think they’re moving that way. Certainly with the next Captain America film there is a lot of struggle.

So the ice is melting a little bit?
Yeah, definitely. All I can say is that he’s going to be struggling a little bit; things aren’t going to be so clear and he’s going to have to lean on his morals and values to find the right answer. With the next film, they’re going to do a very good job of making the right answer difficult to find. Nobody is right, nobody is wrong and decisions have to be made that are going to leave some people unhappy. I think that messes with the concept.

You’ve moved into directing as well. How would you fancy taking on a Marvel film?
Oh God. I don’t know how they’ve pulled it off. It’s such a challenge and so evolved and there are so many people that you have to collaborate with. Given the scope and the size of the film I don’t know if I have the power.

What about the rumours that you’ll quit acting after Captain America?
Oh no. I did an interview and said that once I’m through with Captain America I’d like to focus a bit more on directing. Never ever did I say I was quitting acting, but somehow that was the headline – that I was retiring. I love acting and I will always act. I just meant that in my immediate future, the thing that I’m most interested in is directing.

Is there any costume envy on set?
Everyone has different challenges. I mean, Ruffalo has to wear this kind of motion-capture pyjama onesie which looks incredibly comfortable, but he also looks incredibly foolish, whereas Hemsworth and I get to walk round looking incredibly cool but it takes about an hour to go to the bathroom. So there’s a trade-off.

So that’s Captain America’s weakness? Give him lots of water to drink and he’ll be incapacitated for an hour…
Exactly!

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I have added some missing photoshoots pictures from last year and this year to the gallery. I have also replaced some shoots with higher quality photos! Enjoy!

Gallery Links:
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2014 > Session 010
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2014 > Session 011
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2014 > Session 012
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2014 > Session 013
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2014 > Session 014
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2015 > Session 001
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2015 > Session 002
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2015 > Session 003
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2015 > Session 004

Chris Evans and co-star, Scarlett Johansson will be on The Ellen Show next week, Thursday, April 30!

They’re superheroes and superstars! They’re also a riot together. SCARLETT JOHANSSON & CHRIS EVANS are here with big news about their highly anticipated blockbuster sequel, “Avengers: Age of Ultron”!

Then, Broadway star, actress and musician IDINA MENZEL comes through to talk about hitting the road this summer with her concert tour! She may have been “Frozen” before, but now she’s bringing the heat!

Plus, pop star, Queen aficionado, and “American Idol” alum ADAM LAMBERT will perform “Ghost Town” from his upcoming album!

This Thursday, Ellen’s taking it to a higher level!

Nerds: if you had to choose a way to die, what would it be? Beaten to a pulp by Captain America and Hawkeye, right? Well get ready to be jealous…

Two of the earth’s mightiest heroes chatted to RadioTimes.com about The Avengers: Age of Ultron, the future of the Marvel universe and how they want to smash my teeth in with Cap’s shield. What can I say? I have a way with people.

As well as the continuing adventures of Iron Man and the rest, Evans had some kind words to say about the rival Fantastic Four reboot. Before donning the star-spangled costume, Evans played Johnny ‘Human Torch’ Storm in the 2005 film, a role now taken by Michael B. Jordan.

“I actually can’t wait to see it,” Evans said magnanimously. “Our movies were very specific, and my take on the character was very specific, so it’s going to be interesting to see what he does with it.”

With persistent rumours of Evans letting another actor take up Captain America’s shield, Evans seemed comfortable with the idea of reboots and recastings:

“That’s the beautfiul thing about these characters,” he explained, “whether it’s Batman or Superman…”
…or Captain America?

“…or Captain America, which I’m sure at some point someone else will play. It’s like James Bond, someone else is always going to reincarnate them and play them a different way. That’s great to be a part of the lineage. It’s not yours to keep, it never was.”

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