written by Emily on October 07, 2020

The Thought Leaders Issue: Chris Evans | V Magazine

V MAGAZINE – The actor and co-founder of A Starting Point discusses partisanship, youth activism, and the importance of empathy.

V127’s Thought Leaders Issue is available for pre-order now.

“I knew I had to begin work on [my political engagement platform] A Starting Point after Trump got elected. I disagree with a lot of Trump’s policies, and I personally have a very strong stance on that, which I vocalize on my social media. But my biggest concern is that his methodology is designed to divide. He has never once made an effort to bring us together. [A Starting Point] is designed to inform people so they can take a side.

“[As an actor], the lack of expectation from me [in the political world] actually played to my advantage. When no one expects much of you, it takes the pressure off! It’s more of an uphill battle in terms of getting the ball rolling, because people do a bit of a double take—‘Who wants to interview us?’ But now that we have established what we’re trying to do, it’s gone pretty smoothly.

“I think we are on the cusp of a really motivated, driven generation of young people who are very awake and connected. It’s such a platitude, but they really are the future. It’s always the students, isn’t it? Whether it was the civil rights in the ‘60s or today, it’s always young people [working toward change]. With every younger generation, they care less and less about the archaic social norms that people before them are trying to preserve. Now, more than ever, young people are involved in shaping the political and social landscape. It really is like a potter’s wheel and these young voices are molding our future.

“Regardless of Hollywood’s leanings [to the left], there’s ticket buyers across the spectrum. I may not be blackballed from Hollywood for having emotions that spike, but people might not turn up for my movies. You have to understand that you might be alienating a part of your audience. There’s a time and a place for rage, and I think that’s a last resort. You can just cast a wider net by saying, ‘What do you think? Get involved and form your own opinions.’ I’m trying to find more effective ways of coming together. I model it after the way you operate within a relationship. If you want a relationship to work, you have to listen and understand what the other person is thinking and feeling, even if you disagree—and work on finding commonality. As good as it feels to shout your opinion, you garner more results with a more empathetic approach.”

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written by Emily on November 27, 2017

Secrets of the Marvel Universe

VANITY FAIR – On a sweltering October weekend, the largest-ever group of Marvel superheroes and friends gathered just outside of Atlanta for a top-secret assignment. Eighty-three of the famous faces who have brought Marvel’s comic-book characters to life over the past decade mixed and mingled—Mark Ruffalo, who plays the Hulk, bonded with Vin Diesel, the voice of Groot, the monosyllabic sapling from Guardians of the Galaxy. Angela Bassett, mother to Chadwick Boseman’s Black Panther, flew through hurricane-like conditions to report for duty alongside Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson, Gwyneth Paltrow, Brie Larson, Paul Rudd, Jeremy Renner, Laurence Fishburne, and Stan Lee, the celebrated comic-book writer and co-creator of Iron Man, Spider-Man, Doctor Strange, the Fantastic Four, and the X-Men.

Their mission: to strike a heroic pose to commemorate 10 years of unprecedented moviemaking success. Marvel Studios, which kicked things off with Iron Man in 2008, has released 17 films that collectively have grossed more than $13 billion at the global box office; 5 more movies are due out in the next two years. The sprawling franchise has resuscitated careers (Downey), has minted new stars (Tom Hiddleston), and increasingly attracts an impressive range of A-list talent, from art-house favorites (Benedict Cumberbatch and Tilda Swinton in Doctor Strange) to Hollywood icons (Anthony Hopkins and Robert Redford) to at least three handsome guys named Chris (Hemsworth, Evans, and Pratt). The wattage at the photo shoot was so high that Ant-Man star Michael Douglas—Michael Douglas!—was collecting autographs. (Photographer Jason Bell shot Vanity Fair’s own Marvel portfolio shortly afterward.)

But it wasn’t Samuel L. Jackson’s Nick Fury or even Chris Evans’s Captain America who assembled Earth’s mightiest heroes. They came for Kevin Feige, the unassuming man in a black baseball cap who took Marvel Studios from an underdog endeavor with a roster of B-list characters to a cinematic empire that is the envy of every other studio in town. Feige’s innovative, comic-book-based approach to blockbuster moviemaking—having heroes from one film bleed into the next—has changed not only the way movies are made but also pop culture at large. Fans can’t get enough of a world where space-hopping Guardians of the Galaxy might turn up alongside earthbound Avengers, or Doctor Strange and Black Panther could cross paths via a mind-bending rift in the space-time continuum. Other studios, most notably Warner Bros., with the Justice League, have tried to create their own web of interconnected characters. Why have so many failed to achieve Marvel’s heights? “Simple,” said Joe Russo, co-director of Avengers 3 and 4. “They don’t have a Kevin.”

Before Feige, Marvel Studios wasn’t even making its own films. Created in 1993 as Marvel Films, the movie arm of the comics company simply licensed its characters to other studios, earning most of its money from merchandise sales. (The popular 2002 Sam Raimi-directed Spider-Man movie, for example, was made by Sony’s Columbia Pictures.) Feige was part of the team that pushed for the studio to take full creative control of its library of beloved characters, a risky move at the time. “For us old-timers—me and Robert [Downey] and Gwyneth [Paltrow] and Kevin—it felt like we were the upper-classmen,” Jon Favreau, director of the first two Iron Man movies, told me shortly after the photo shoot. “We were emotional . . . thinking about how precarious it all felt in the beginning.”

Read more of the story at the source

written by Emily on June 06, 2017

Chris Evans for Empire Magazine

Chris is featured in the Summer issue of Empire. I’ve added some digital scans from the magazine, thanks to AliKat. I’ve also added some outtakes from the magazine to the gallery. Enjoy!

written by Emily on April 13, 2017

Chris for L’Uomo Vogue

L’Uomo Vogue is featured in the April 2017 issue of L’Uomo Vogue. I absolutely love this photoshoot! I’ve added digital scans along with a few outtakes from the magazine to the gallery. Hopefully we’ll be able to get these in better quality soon.

written by Emily on March 19, 2017

Esquire April 2017 Scans

Hi Chris fans, I have updated the gallery with digital scans of Chris featured in the April 2017 issue of Esquire to the gallery!

written by Emily on March 15, 2017

Chris Evans for Esquire

ESQUIRE – The Canadian commandos are the first to jump. Our plane reaches an altitude of about eight thousand feet; the back door opens. Although it’s a warm winter day below in rural southern California, up here, not so much. In whooshes freezing air and the cold reality that this is actually happening. Out drop the eight commandos, all in black-and-red camouflage, one after the other. For them it’s a training exercise, and Jesus, these crazy bastards are stoked. The last Canuck to exit into the nothingness is a freakishly tall stud with a crew cut and a handlebar mustache; just before he leaps, he flashes a smile our way. Yeah, yeah, we get it: You’re a badass.

Moments later, the plane’s at ten thousand feet, and the next to go are a Middle Eastern couple in their late thirties. These two can’t wait. They are ecstatic. Skydiving is clearly a thing for them. Why? I can’t help thinking. Is it like foreplay? Do they rush off to the car after landing and get it on in the parking lot? They give us the thumbs-up and they’re gone.

Just like that, we’re at 12,500 feet and it’s our turn. Me and Chris Evans, recognized throughout the universe as the star of the Marvel-comic-book-inspired Captain America and Avengers movies. The five films in the series, which began in 2011 with Captain America: The First Avenger, have grossed more than $4 billion.

The two of us, plus four crew members, are the only ones left in the back of the plane. Over the loud drone of the twin propellers, one of the crew members shouts, “Okay, who’s going first?”

Evans and I are seated on benches opposite each other. Neither of us answers. I look at him; he looks at me. I feel like I’ve swallowed a live rat. Evans is over there, all Captain America cool, smiling away.

Read more at the source!

written by Emily on September 12, 2016

Chris Evans for W Magazine

Chris Evans is featured on the cover of the October issue of W Magazine for The New Royals along with a few other celebs. You can check out the cover along with two outtakes in the gallery. A short video below and his interview can be read below!

W MAGAZINE – Chris Evans’ start in Hollywood wasn’t so auspicious. From his infamous scene in Not Another Teen Movie to playing “Harvard Hottie” in The Nanny Diaries, starring his future co-star Scarlett Johansson, he’s enjoyed a slow burn rise to the top. “I’m glad that I didn’t you know come out of the gates with the first thing being some huge critically-acclaimed success. It’s been very nice and educational,” he says. For the past five years, he’s been known to us as Captain America, one of the most classic roles in the Marvel universe, which is why it made sense to pair him with a new arrival to the superhero genre, Chiwetel Ejiofor, in our annuals Royals package. Here, he talks about his rise in Hollywood, from the his very first part in high school to his roles in the cult-favorite Snowpiercer and the upcoming Gifted.

Tell me the first thing you ever auditioned for. How old were you? I must have been 12 or something. Maybe my first audition ever was a school play, a play called Crazy Camp. And it was in sixth grade. And, well, I didn’t get the lead; I played the supporting lead, which was just as good. I ended up dating one of the more popular girls as a result, and then the second the play was over, she dumped me. And I learned then the power of getting a good role.

And did you get the bug as well, aside from the girl? I did. It was a lot of fun. It was something that I took to it very easily. It just felt very comfortable, very natural. My older sister did it, so seeing her do it, and anything she did, we wanted to copy. So it just felt natural, and there was a bunch of local community theaters so I just started doing plays year-round. At that point it was still a hobby. I still kind of had my sights set on being an artist. I was big into drawing, painting. I really liked animation. You know part of me kind of wanted to work for Disney or Pixar. Well I guess Pixar really hadn’t been flushed out at the time. You know I remember when Beauty and the Beast came out in theaters, it was the first time they had started to incorporate computers, and it was just a really cool thing, and I remember thinking ‘I’ll never not like cartoons’ [laughs], and this is just a great format for really unique storytelling. And I loved Fantasia. And so at the time it was much more about art. Then at some point in high school, it started to become a little more focused on acting, and by senior year I had committed. That’s the good thing about doing community theater. The ratio of guy to girl is drastically imbalanced, so you have a much greater chance of getting a good part.

Read more at the source

written by Emily on April 30, 2016

Scans from People Magazine (May 09)

Thanks to my friend Claudia, I have added two scans of Chris and Robert featured in the latest issue of People Magazine. You can also check out an outtake from the shoot in the gallery!

written by Emily on April 29, 2016

Scans from Grazia (May 03)

Thanks to my friend Nicole, I have added four scans of Chris featured in the May 3rd issue of Grazia to the gallery!

written by Emily on April 15, 2016

Scans from Entertainment Weekly (April 22/29)

As promised, I have added high quality digital scans from the April 22/29 issue of Entertainment Weekly to the gallery!

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