009.jpg
007.jpg
008.jpg
006.jpg
005.jpg
001.jpg
008.jpg
007.jpg
010.jpg
009.jpg
009.jpg
010.jpg
003.jpg
004.jpg
006.jpg
005.jpg
008.jpg
007.jpg
002.jpg
001.jpg
006.jpg
005.jpg

Yesterday (April 23), Chris visited Late Night With Seth Meyers. He talked about his current broadway show, Lobby Hero as well as his upcoming film Avengers: Infinity War. Later, Chris brought out his brother Scott to do a little game to see how well they know each other.

Check out photos of Chris’ appearance in the gallery as well as interview clips below.

Yesterday (March 26), Chris attended the opening night party of his broadway production Lobby Hero. Check out some photos from the after party and a few photos from the opening night performance. More to be added soon!


NY TIMES – Chris Evans has a theory about tap dancing. “Tap is waiting to have its day,” he said one recent afternoon, sitting in a TriBeCa hotel clubhouse around the corner from an apartment he’s been renting since last month. Mr. Evans, or Captain America, as he’s been known in omnipresent Marvel movies for the better part of a decade, tapped as a child and still has sincere reverence for the form. His theory is that tap dancing today, like competitive hip-hop dancing in the early 2000s, is generally undervalued and ripe for a comeback.

“If you walk down the street and you see someone tapping,” you stop in your tracks, he said, using an unprintable word, “because it’s awesome.”

Twice a week since he’s been living in New York, Mr. Evans, who ordinarily splits his time between his native Boston and Los Angeles, has taken refuge in tap, clearing his mind and working up a sweat in private lessons taught by a friend. The lessons aren’t preparation for any role in particular, although Mr. Evans is hard at work on a pivotal one: his Broadway debut, as a charming but manipulative cop in Kenneth Lonergan’s “Lobby Hero,” which is now in previews and opens March 26 at the Helen Hayes Theater.

The dancing, rather, is just a low-pressure new hobby (“It makes me feel like I’m a part of the music,” Mr. Evans said.) Along with the play, and the move to a new city, it’s one component in an ad hoc but inevitable process — not quite a rebirth, more like a re-orientation — designed to help the 36-year-old actor answer a nagging question: What do you do with your life after walking away from the role of a lifetime?

Since 2011, the year “Captain America: The First Avenger” was released, Mr. Evans’s face (and torso, and biceps) has signified a marketable mix of principled strength and rank-and-file virtue as reliably as any in Hollywood. He was a working-class revolutionary in the dystopic thriller “Snowpiercer,” a stoic defender of the public school system in the indie family drama “Gifted,” a cunning spy who risks everything to save a persecuted minority in the soon-to-be-released “The Red Sea Diving Resort.”

Continue reading

Last Friday (February 16), Chris attended a meet and greet with the cast of Lobby Hero at Sardi’s in New York City. The gallery has now been updated with HQ photos!

Sorry for the late updates. Super busy month for me with university. Two weeks ago (February 5), Chris attended a lightning ceremony at Hayes Theater from Second Stage Theater Broadway. I have added HQ photos of Chris at the ceremony.


After a very long delay.. I have found the time and motivation to sort through Captain America: Civil War. Blu-ray screencaptures of Chris as the amazing Steve Rogers/Captain America have now been added to the gallery. In addition, I have also added screencaptures from the different blu-ray features!

Next captures I will be working on is from Chris’ film last year, Gifted. Stay tuned!


PLAYBILL – Second Stage Theater has released a first-look photo of the cast of Lobby Hero, Oscar winner Kenneth Lonergan’s play that will kick off 2ST’s inaugural Broadway season this spring. Chris Evans will make his Broadway debut in the production alongside Brian Tyree Henry, Michael Cera, and Bel Powley.

Lobby Hero will be directed by Trip Cullman and will begin previews March 1 at the Helen Hayes Theatre. Opening night is March 26.

Lobby Hero premiered Off-Broadway at Playwrights Horizons in 2001. The play tells the story of four New Yorkers involved in a murder investigation in the lobby of a Manhattan apartment complex: a 27-year-old security guard, his stern boss, a young police officer, and her unpredictable partner.

The Broadway production will feature scenic design by David Rockwell, costume design by Paloma Young, lighting design by Japhy Weideman, sound design by Darron L West, and casting by Telsey + Company.

For ticket information visit 2ST.com or call the Second Stage Box Office at (212) 246-4422.

Hi Chris fans! For the last two days, Chris was spotted on the set of the fourth Avengers film in Atlanta, Georgia. Check out HQ photos in the gallery!


VANITY FAIR – On a sweltering October weekend, the largest-ever group of Marvel superheroes and friends gathered just outside of Atlanta for a top-secret assignment. Eighty-three of the famous faces who have brought Marvel’s comic-book characters to life over the past decade mixed and mingled—Mark Ruffalo, who plays the Hulk, bonded with Vin Diesel, the voice of Groot, the monosyllabic sapling from Guardians of the Galaxy. Angela Bassett, mother to Chadwick Boseman’s Black Panther, flew through hurricane-like conditions to report for duty alongside Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson, Gwyneth Paltrow, Brie Larson, Paul Rudd, Jeremy Renner, Laurence Fishburne, and Stan Lee, the celebrated comic-book writer and co-creator of Iron Man, Spider-Man, Doctor Strange, the Fantastic Four, and the X-Men.

Their mission: to strike a heroic pose to commemorate 10 years of unprecedented moviemaking success. Marvel Studios, which kicked things off with Iron Man in 2008, has released 17 films that collectively have grossed more than $13 billion at the global box office; 5 more movies are due out in the next two years. The sprawling franchise has resuscitated careers (Downey), has minted new stars (Tom Hiddleston), and increasingly attracts an impressive range of A-list talent, from art-house favorites (Benedict Cumberbatch and Tilda Swinton in Doctor Strange) to Hollywood icons (Anthony Hopkins and Robert Redford) to at least three handsome guys named Chris (Hemsworth, Evans, and Pratt). The wattage at the photo shoot was so high that Ant-Man star Michael Douglas—Michael Douglas!—was collecting autographs. (Photographer Jason Bell shot Vanity Fair’s own Marvel portfolio shortly afterward.)

But it wasn’t Samuel L. Jackson’s Nick Fury or even Chris Evans’s Captain America who assembled Earth’s mightiest heroes. They came for Kevin Feige, the unassuming man in a black baseball cap who took Marvel Studios from an underdog endeavor with a roster of B-list characters to a cinematic empire that is the envy of every other studio in town. Feige’s innovative, comic-book-based approach to blockbuster moviemaking—having heroes from one film bleed into the next—has changed not only the way movies are made but also pop culture at large. Fans can’t get enough of a world where space-hopping Guardians of the Galaxy might turn up alongside earthbound Avengers, or Doctor Strange and Black Panther could cross paths via a mind-bending rift in the space-time continuum. Other studios, most notably Warner Bros., with the Justice League, have tried to create their own web of interconnected characters. Why have so many failed to achieve Marvel’s heights? “Simple,” said Joe Russo, co-director of Avengers 3 and 4. “They don’t have a Kevin.”

Before Feige, Marvel Studios wasn’t even making its own films. Created in 1993 as Marvel Films, the movie arm of the comics company simply licensed its characters to other studios, earning most of its money from merchandise sales. (The popular 2002 Sam Raimi-directed Spider-Man movie, for example, was made by Sony’s Columbia Pictures.) Feige was part of the team that pushed for the studio to take full creative control of its library of beloved characters, a risky move at the time. “For us old-timers—me and Robert [Downey] and Gwyneth [Paltrow] and Kevin—it felt like we were the upper-classmen,” Jon Favreau, director of the first two Iron Man movies, told me shortly after the photo shoot. “We were emotional . . . thinking about how precarious it all felt in the beginning.”

Read more of the story at the source

On Wednesday (November 1), Chris attended a Celebrity Gaming Event and Xbox Live Session in Atlanta hosted by himself, Lauren Cohan and Lil Jon. You can check out three photos from the event in our gallery and watch a video of Chris at the session below.

EventsPhotosVideos