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Yesterday (April 23), Chris visited Late Night With Seth Meyers. He talked about his current broadway show, Lobby Hero as well as his upcoming film Avengers: Infinity War. Later, Chris brought out his brother Scott to do a little game to see how well they know each other.

Check out photos of Chris’ appearance in the gallery as well as interview clips below.

BOSTON GLOBE – Betrayed by the system. Cast out by his beloved country’s leadership. Suddenly, bitterly at odds with longtime friends. It sure has been a rough couple of movies for Chris Evans’s Captain America.

“Government and the military were always where he looked to find order and a sense of home,” says Sudbury native Evans, speaking by phone from New York. “In ‘The Winter Soldier,’ when those failed him, his chosen family became the thing he would set his watch to. Then, in ‘Civil War,’ that fell apart.”

Audiences looking for the old familiar Steve Rogers, super soldier, may have to sit tight for a bit in watching “Avengers: Infinity War.” “There’s been this period of sadness and disillusionment, where you go inside yourself for a while,” he continues. “But we’ll see him reemerging and reconnecting.”

Evans, 36, shared further thoughts on the new movie — and his seven-year tour of duty as Cap — during a day off from his Broadway debut, “Lobby Hero,” a revival of a drama by “Manchester by the Sea” writer-director Kenneth Lonergan.

Q. You’ve been playing Captain America since “The First Avenger,” back in 2011. Has the process of making these movies changed for you?

A. During the first couple of films, I was a little overwhelmed, I suppose. You’re grateful to be there, but also intimidated by the magnitude and the responsibility. But then as you get more and more comfortable with the process, everything kind of ascends in unison. The people that you’re working with start to become family, you become much more familiar with the way these things come to life, and you can start being more precise and involved.

Q. What’s been most fulfilling about the way you’ve been able to develop Cap over this many movies?

A. It’s exciting to actually get to grow with a character and find a more broad, long-term arc, versus having to accomplish something in an hour and a half. But to be honest, none of it would really work if it weren’t for the people at Marvel. They care so much about the characters because they’re fans themselves. You just do this one small thing, and then you get to stand on their shoulders.

Q. Which actors do you interact with most out of the sprawling “Infinity War” cast? And are Marvel’s pairings purely about the story, or does chemistry figure into it?

A. I think they factor in a lot of things — who the fans enjoy watching together; who the characters benefit from, based on their natures, where they’re trying to send each one. Without spoiling anything, I’d say I have a lot of stuff with Scarlett [Johansson] again this time. One of Cap’s through-lines has been his relationship with Black Widow. It’s an unlikely friendship, where they really depend on each other in a very specific way.

Q. Is the physical aspect of playing Cap and the toll it takes still comparable to when you started?

A. No, I definitely can feel myself aging a little. There were a couple of moments in the script where I read them and thought, “Wow, this is going to be a challenge.” It’s still fun to go to work and really throw yourself around, and it’s rewarding to go home on those days and feel you contributed and gave it everything you had. But it certainly is a bit harder to wake up the next morning [laughs].

Q. If there’s some part of Cap’s iconography that people now think of specifically as a Chris Evans touch, what would you hope it is?

A. Being selfless without being sanctimonious. It’s a danger — he’s a very magnanimous character, very noble, and I think that can slip into piety pretty easily. So trying to keep that sense of being a good man without, basically, being annoying [laughs].

Q. That’s quite a mustache you’re sporting for the cop character you play in “Lobby Hero.” Should fans be bracing themselves when they catch you on the “Avengers” publicity circuit?

A. Yeah, sadly, I can’t take that off [laughs]. That thing’s with me for the next month.

Chris Evans (Captain America), Chris Hemsworth (Thor), and Tom Hiddleston (Loki), stars of the worldwide hit Avengers film franchise, are headlining ACE Comic Con Seattle, June 22-23-24 at the WaMu Theater & CenturyLink Field Event Center. Additional guests will be announced soon. VIP Admissions, Photo Ops, Autographs, and General Admission tickets go on sale Thursday, March 29, 2018 at 10am Pacific Time via www.aceuniverse.com.

ACE Comic Cons are produced by ACE Universe, a multimedia and experiential events company representing the Voice of The Superhero Generation. Created by brothers Gareb and Stephen Shamus, who have over 20 years of experience and 175 Comic Con shows under their belts, ACE is redefining the entire Comic Con industry and business. ACE Comic Con Seattle is the next installment of the already successful ACE Comic Con brand. Prior events featured such global icons as Gal Gadot (Wonder Woman), Henry Cavill (Superman), Tom Holland (Spider-Man), Jason Momoa (Aquaman), Stan Lee (Marvel), and many more.

“We are excited to bring the Seattle and Pacific Northwest fans the premium-level event they deserve,” says Gareb Shamus, ACE Universe CEO. “ACE’s goal is to deliver a Comic Con experience worthy of fans who live in a virtual and digital universe. ACE Comic Con Seattle will feature celebrity interviews, multi-staged interactive workshops, and presentations by top creators from writers and show-runners, to costume designers and special effects artists.”

“This is the best guest list the Pacific Northwest has ever seen,” says Stephen Shamus, ACE Comic Con President. “To have Chris Evans, Chris Hemsworth, and Tom Hiddleston – three global superstars – while the multi-billion dollar Avengers film franchise continues to smash box office records – is an absolute coup for the fans of Seattle, and followers of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. We will be announcing more guests shortly.” ACE Universe has partnered with major players across key categories including technology, media, entertainment, gaming, publishing, manufacturing, licensing, and retailing to create the most immersive, robust experience for its audience.”

Stay tuned as ACE Universe will announce additional 2018 dates, cities and ticket information at www.aceuniverse.com and on the ACE Comic Con social channels at Facebook.com/acecomiccon or @acecomiccon on Instagram and Twitter.

Yesterday (March 26), Chris attended the opening night party of his broadway production Lobby Hero. Check out some photos from the after party and a few photos from the opening night performance. More to be added soon!


NY TIMES – Chris Evans has a theory about tap dancing. “Tap is waiting to have its day,” he said one recent afternoon, sitting in a TriBeCa hotel clubhouse around the corner from an apartment he’s been renting since last month. Mr. Evans, or Captain America, as he’s been known in omnipresent Marvel movies for the better part of a decade, tapped as a child and still has sincere reverence for the form. His theory is that tap dancing today, like competitive hip-hop dancing in the early 2000s, is generally undervalued and ripe for a comeback.

“If you walk down the street and you see someone tapping,” you stop in your tracks, he said, using an unprintable word, “because it’s awesome.”

Twice a week since he’s been living in New York, Mr. Evans, who ordinarily splits his time between his native Boston and Los Angeles, has taken refuge in tap, clearing his mind and working up a sweat in private lessons taught by a friend. The lessons aren’t preparation for any role in particular, although Mr. Evans is hard at work on a pivotal one: his Broadway debut, as a charming but manipulative cop in Kenneth Lonergan’s “Lobby Hero,” which is now in previews and opens March 26 at the Helen Hayes Theater.

The dancing, rather, is just a low-pressure new hobby (“It makes me feel like I’m a part of the music,” Mr. Evans said.) Along with the play, and the move to a new city, it’s one component in an ad hoc but inevitable process — not quite a rebirth, more like a re-orientation — designed to help the 36-year-old actor answer a nagging question: What do you do with your life after walking away from the role of a lifetime?

Since 2011, the year “Captain America: The First Avenger” was released, Mr. Evans’s face (and torso, and biceps) has signified a marketable mix of principled strength and rank-and-file virtue as reliably as any in Hollywood. He was a working-class revolutionary in the dystopic thriller “Snowpiercer,” a stoic defender of the public school system in the indie family drama “Gifted,” a cunning spy who risks everything to save a persecuted minority in the soon-to-be-released “The Red Sea Diving Resort.”

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EW – The wait for Avengers: Infinity War just got shorter by one week, at least in North America.

The movie was set to open May 4 here, while it was opening April 27 in most international markets (with a few earlier April 25 debuts in a handful of countries). Sources at Marvel Studios and Disney tell EW they decided to change course and open the movie worldwide on the same date.

They did so via a little exchange with Tony Stark.