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INSTYLE.COM – So this is a fashion story, huh?” asks Chris Evans, as he lies back on his sofa and kicks his red Timberland Earthkeepers onto the wooden coffee table in his Los Angeles home. “Well, it may be my last one. If I were the only man left on this earth, I’d be wearing sweatpants every day for the rest of my life.” The 34-year-old Boston native may not be a sartorial savant, but just a week before this interview, the scruffy Captain America stud attended the Academy Awards was looking dapper in a simple black Prada tuxedo, bow tie, and slicked-back hair.

“It was an out-of-body experience,” he says. “I grew up watching the Oscars, so being there makes me appreciate how far I’ve come.” In the early ’90s, Evans started his career as one of the dreamy guys you could romance in the board game Mystery Date. He went on an open casting call and booked the “role” of Tyler. Fast forward 20 years and the actor is headlining two major new movies: the third installment of his blockbuster Marvel series Captain America: Civil War, in theaters now, and the Marc Webb–directed family drama Gifted. The latter is a departure from his superhero filmography, but Evans, who says he practiced Buddhism since his early 20s, believes in taking on projects he connects with. “I want everything I do to come from a pure place so that I don’t become soured by the experience. I just like things to be easy in my everyday life,” he admits. “I don’t even like shaving.”

Clearly, you’re not a huge fashion guy. How would you describe your approach to style?
I try to be simple, classic, and clean. I don’t like my jeans to be too frilly, so I go with basic Levi’s and a fitted white T-shirt. I appreciate a retro vibe—a nice James Dean or Paul Newman look. It takes me about two minutes to get dressed, but then I’ll get photographed sometimes and think, Oh, s—. I look like a bum.

Do you ever accessorize?
I always prioritize function. I like Barton Perreira sunglasses because I have very weak eyes, so I’m always squinting—there you go, that’s fashiony! You can’t really go wrong with Ray-Bans either. If I’m going to get all dressed up and go to the nines, an IWC watch is nice.

How about shoes?
My favorite article of clothing is a good pair of sneakers. Solid footwear makes me feel more secure, athletic, and mobile. I’m not into labels, so I don’t care what kind of sneakers they are, as long as they’re comfortable and the laces tie. I’m not the barefoot type of guy.

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NY DAILY NEWS – As off-screen do-gooders go, Captain America takes the cake.

Actor Chris Evans, star of “Captain America: Civil War,” surprised a packed Manhattan movie theater full of young volunteers Wednesday night for a special New York Daily News/Disney charity screening of his new movie.

And he even led the audience in serenading a soon-to-be-13-year-old good Samaritan with a rousing “Happy Birthday” — while toting a superhero-themed cupcake and Captain America toys for every kid in the theater, courtesy of the movie studio.

“Knowing that the role, though demanding and though heavy with responsibility, you get that type of reaction and it’s all worth it,” Evans told the Daily News immediately after exiting the theater.

It reminded him of the time he met his idol, Hulk Hogan, and got an action figure signed as a child.

“I feel like I am those kids screaming,” he said. “Because I remember what it was like when I was a kid. When things really drove me wild.”

The screening honored a pair of charities that encourage kids to volunteer. GenerationOn, the youth services division of Points of Light, inspires, equips and mobilizes kids to improve the world through volunteer services in their communities.

“It’s really great to see someone of his standing interested in this stuff, because it makes people see what needs to be done. … Wow, Captain America believes in this? We should too,” said Eden Duncan-Smith, a 16-year-old volunteer with Generation On.

CelebrateU, founded by a pair of teens, organizes birthday parties for less-fortunate kids in shelters.

“We were really excited to come to the movie in the first place, and we had no idea he was going to be there,” said Chase Cauder, 16, cofounder of CelebrateU. “And when he came out we were like wow.”

On Wednesday, the tables were turned on one of that organization’s volunteers. Archie Silverstein, who turns 13 this month, was himself feted. He had recently donated his Bar Mitzvah gift money to the charity.

“It was pretty awesome to see a guy I admire so much come out of nowhere and wish me a happy birthday. It was so insane. I had no idea,” said Silverstein.

In “Captain America: Civil War,” opening late Thursday, Evans reprises his role as the star-spangled hero, facing off against his most dangerous foe — his old Avengers teammate Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) — over a push to bring superheroes under the government’s control.

But before the lights dimmed, Evans put the spotlight on the assembled kids, thanking them for helping to make the world a better place without CGI superpowers or stunt doubles.

“It’s a cool thing to think you might have a place in one of their chapters of their childhood,” said Evans.

ROLLING STONES – There are black helicopters buzzing over Hollywood Boulevard. The LAPD has shut down traffic in both directions. Thousands of civilians are amassed on the sidewalk. If this were a comic- book movie, now would be the time when the sky opens up and the alien mothership comes swooping in, space guns blazing. But because it’s just the premiere of a comic-book movie – Marvel’s Captain America: Civil War, opening this month – all the hubbub merely presages the arrival of the man of the hour, the leader of the Avengers, Cap himself: 34-year-old Chris Evans, flashing an action figure smile as he steps out of a blue Audi sports car and onto the red carpet.

The sports car was not Evans’ idea. Audi is a big sponsor of Captain America: Civil War, and the product placement apparently extends to the premiere, where he and his co-star/antagonist in the film, Robert Downey Jr., have been asked to arrive in matching Audi R8s – red for Downey’s Iron Man, blue for Evans’ Cap. Up until then, Evans was having a stress-free evening, pre-partying at his home in the Hollywood Hills with his mom and brother and some buddies from back home in Boston, getting loose before his big night. But when he got to the theater and had to do the car thing – that’s when the anxiety kicked in.

“It’s a little nerve-racking,” Evans says two days later. “You’re in the SUV with your family, your people. And then you have to pull over in some weird parking lot and do the swap. There’s security and all these people. All of a sudden you’re out of your comfort zone. It’s strange. The little things that can tip you over.”

“It’s funny,” says Scarlett Johansson, a frequent Captain America and Avengers co-star who’s known Evans since she was 17. “He’s extremely easygoing, he loves to hang out, he loves to be around people. But whenever we do a premiere, or he has to be in the fray in some work-related context, he’s terrified.” Downey told something similar to Jimmy Kimmel the night after the premiere: “Chris Evans is such a nervous Nellie,” he said. “We’re supposed to drive in in the Audis, and he’s like, ‘Bro, I don’t know – should you go first, or I should go first?’ I was like, ‘Man up, dude!'” (Later, to Rolling Stone, he also says Evans had to excuse himself for a cigarette.)

You’d think this stuff would be easy for Evans by now. He’s one of the biggest names in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, the sprawling, $8 billion Disney-owned enterprise that includes his three Captain America films; the Iron Man, Thor and Hulk franchises; and the all-star Avengers team-ups, two of the top-grossing movies of all time. Shouldn’t he be comfortable with a few cameras and fans? But to hear Evans tell it, he’s one of the least-comfortable movie stars around. The acting part is fine; it’s everything else he can’t handle.

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USA TODAY – ATLANTA — Tony Stark is really irked, and it’s not just because someone has left used coffee grounds in the official Avengers coffeemaker.

The ultra-modern Porsche building outside downtown Atlanta has been turned into the headquarters of Earth’s mightiest heroes on the set of the new Marvel movie Captain America: Civil War (in theaters Friday), and Robert Downey Jr.’s playboy billionaire philanthropist, who’s huffy about his state-of-the-art kitchen being “a bed-and-breakfast for a biker gang,” has one serious headache that a cup of joe won’t fix.

His team has just been told that 117 countries have ratified the Sokovia Accords, which will put the Avengers under a United Nations oversight committee in just a few days’ time. It’s the result of one too many global disasters, and the cracks in this superhero family are starting to show even in the luxury digs.

At least all that internal strife won’t have an adverse effect on the group’s box-office power. The 13th film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Civil War was voted the most anticipated summer movie in a recent survey by Fandango, and according to the ticket-buying site, the film is outselling every other Marvel effort in advance sales. “The guaranteed amount of repeat viewing will propel the film to what I believe will be one of the top opening weekends of all time and off-the-charts long-term playability around the world,” says comScore senior media analyst Paul Dergarabedian.

Over the successful course of three solo Iron Man films and two Avengers movies, Tony Stark has seen some seriously bad stuff and is OK with being put in check. He tells the team of a bright young man who wanted to spend the summer building sustainable homes in Sokovia, but “we dropped a building on him” when the Avengers battled the evil robot Ultron in the fictional European country (see: last year’s Avengers: Age of Ultron). “If we have no boundaries,” Stark figures, “we’re just as bad as the bad guys.”

This isn’t the kind of freedom Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) has been fighting for as Captain America since World War II, and he lets his disapproval be known. “I’m not saying we’re perfect,” he says. “But the safest hands are still our own.”

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EW.COM – The crew called their big scene the “Splash Page.” That’s the comic-book term for a full-spread illustration that either opens a story or marks its climax.

For Captain America: Civil War, this was the moment they filmed an epic throwdown between two teams of heroes: the forces of Chris Evans’ red, white, and blue soldier on one side, clashing against the warriors aligned with Robert Downey Jr.’s Iron Man on the other.

The 2006-07 Marvel Comics series that inspired the movie, which opens May 6, explores the same enduring question of freedom versus safety. In the Mark Millar-scripted comics, hero turned against hero as some resisted government control of their identities and abilities while others sought compliance and regulation for the greater good. Captain America stood for independence from government control, while Iron Man worked to legislate and enforce responsibility on those with “enhanced abilities.”

“In most of the movies, there’s no question who we should be siding with,” Evans says during a break between shots. “We all agree Nazis are bad, aliens from space are bad. But this movie’s the first time where you really have two points of view. There’s really no wrong answer here and it’s just a matter of who we are as men: Tony Stark and myself. Which side of the aisle do we come down on? So it’s hard for [Cap]. It becomes a question of morality and I don’t think he’s ever been so uncertain with what right and wrong is.”

In this film, the new Avengers — seen assembling at the end of Age of Ultron — take on an old enemy: Frank Grillo’s Crossbones, last spotted getting a building dropped on his skull in 2013’s Captain America: The Winter Soldier. But… the takedown goes wrong. A lot of people die. A lot of innocent ones.

After all the chaos and catastrophe witnessed in the previous films, the world finally has had enough. Government officials from around the globe assemble to enact accords that would clamp down on those with super-human skills. One man helping form the new laws is a young leader named T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) from the fictional African nation of Wakanda, who has a secret identity himself — the long awaited Black Panther.

But Cap has seen too much corrupt authority in his (unnaturally) long life. He ain’t marching anymore.

On this already broiling July morning in Fayetteville, Georgia, Evans is sweating through his Cap mask as he shoots the Splash Page — this culmination of the conflict over the accords.

He’s standing at the end of a flat expanse of asphalt, ringed with two-story green tarps that will allow special-effects artists to transform this Pinewood Studios parking lot into a tarmac at Leipzig/Halle International Airport.

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THEWRAP.COM – Tate Taylor is directing the movie, which will star Emily Blunt, Rebecca Ferguson and Haley Bennett

Comic book movie stars Chris Evans and Jared Leto are being sought to play the male leads in “The Girl on the Train” at DreamWorks, TheWrap has learned.

Emily Blunt, Rebecca Ferguson and Haley Bennett are set to star in Tate Taylor‘s adaptation of Paula Hawkins’ bestselling book.
Both actors would have to overcome major scheduling obstacles, but if their deals make, Evans would play Ferguson’s husband, Tom, while Leto would play Bennett’s husband, Scott.

Blunt stars as Rachel, who fantasizes during her daily commute about the seemingly perfect couple who live in a house that her train passes every day, until she sees something shocking happen there one morning and becomes entangled in the mystery that unfolds.
Ferguson will play Anna, who is married to Rachel’s ex-husband (Evans). Bennett will play Megan, a married neighbor who goes missing.

Erin Cressida Wilson wrote the script for the film, which is being produced by Marc Platt. Executive producers include Jared LeBoff and Celia Costas.

Leto will soon be seen as the Joker in “Suicide Squad,” while Evans will reprise his titular role in “Captain America: Civil War.”

People.com – Beneath the muscles and the machismo of Captain America, there’s a softer side to Chris Evans – at least according to the actor himself.

“I’m a pretty romantic guy,” Evans, 34, told PEOPLE at the premiere of his directorial debut, Before We Go, in Hollywood on Wednesday night.

“I don’t necessarily limit the notion of romance to people, though. I think I have a romantic relationship to art, to music, to nature,” added Evans.

With that in mind, he also revealed the most romantic thing he’s ever done for someone – even if that someone was himself: “I went camping once for three weeks by myself, which is very romantic,” he told reporters. “It’s true. It was very romantic, but maybe not in the conventional sense.”

The first-time director also stars in the film as a trumpet player who spends one night with a stranger who may or may not be the love of his life.

“It’s two people who are somewhat damaged and find some peace in the arms of a stranger. I think that sometimes that’s the best place to go,” Evans said. “Sometimes you can really spill your guts when you’re talking to someone who has no judgment.”

Through the years, Evans has been linked to many actresses, including Jessica Biel, Minka Kelly, Sandra Bullock and, most recently, Lily Collins. But hints that right now he’s simply married to his movie.

“Oh God, I couldn’t even think about my own life,” said Evans when asked if he’s ready to stop playing the field and settle down. “I had no life during this movie. This movie was all about the movie and that was it.”

The film about a man (Evans) who tries to raise the brilliant young daughter of his dead sister will shoot in the fall.

Chris Evans has signed on to star in Marc Webb’s next directorial outing, Gifted.

The Fox Searchlight film about a man (Evans) who tries to raise the brilliant young daughter of his dead sister will shoot in the fall.

Tom Flynn (Highboys and Lowboys) wrote the screenplay. FilmNation is selling international rights to the film.

Gifted marks Webb’s first film since 2014’s The Amazing Spider-Man 2, which did not receive a third outing after disappointing reviews and so-so box-office. He previously made the critically acclaimed (500) Days of Summer for Searchlight.

Evans and Webb are repped by CAA.

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Marvel Studios has commenced principal photography at Pinewood Studios in Atlanta, Georgia on “Captain America: Civil War,” the third installment of its Super Hero franchise. The production will shoot on location in Atlanta, Georgia, which serves as the base for the film’s production, as well as locations in Germany, Puerto Rico and Iceland.

Set for release in the United States on May 6, 2016, “Captain America: Civil War” is directed by Anthony and Joe Russo (Marvel’s “Captain America: The Winter Soldier,” “Community”) from a screenplay by Christopher Markus & Stephen McFeely (“Captain America: The Winter Solider,” Marvel’s “Captain America: The First Avenger”). The film returns Chris Evans (“Captain America: The Winter Soldier,” Marvel’s “Avengers: Age of Ultron”) as the iconic Super Hero character Steve Rogers/Captain America along with Robert Downey Jr. (“Avengers: Age of Ultron,” Marvel’s “Iron Man 3”) as Tony Stark/Iron Man, Scarlett Johansson (“Avengers: Age of Ultron,” “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”) as Natasha Romanoff/Black Widow, Sebastian Stan (“Captain America: The Winter Soldier,” “Captain America: The First Avenger”) as Bucky Barnes/Winter Soldier, Anthony Mackie (“Avengers: Age of Ultron,” “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”) as Sam Wilson/Falcon, Paul Bettany (“Avengers: Age of Ultron,” “Iron Man 3”) as The Vision, Jeremy Renner (“Avengers: Age of Ultron,” Marvel’s “The Avengers”) as Clint Barton/Hawkeye, Don Cheadle (“Avengers: Age of Ultron,” “Iron Man 3”) as Jim Rhodes/War Machine and Elizabeth Olsen (“Avengers: Age of Ultron,” “Godzilla”) as Wanda Maximoff/Scarlet Witch.

After his debut in Marvel’s “Ant-Man” on July 17, 2015, Paul Rudd (“Ant-Man,” ”Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues”) will make his first appearance alongside the Avengers as Scott Lang/Ant-Man in “Captain America: Civil War.”

The film also includes outstanding additional cast, including Chadwick Boseman (“42,” “Get on Up”) as T’Challa/Black Panther, Emily VanCamp (“Captain America: The Winter Soldier,” “Revenge”) as Sharon Carter/Agent 13, Daniel Brühl (“Inglourious Basterds,” “Bourne Ultimatum”), Frank Grillo (“Captain America: The Winter Soldier,” “Warrior”) as Brock Rumlow/Crossbones, William Hurt (“A History of Violence,” Marvel’s “The Incredible Hulk”) as General Thaddeus “Thunderbolt” Ross and Martin Freeman (“The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey,” “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies”).

“Captain America: Civil War” picks up where “Avengers: Age of Ultron” left off, as Steve Rogers leads the new team of Avengers in their continued efforts to safeguard humanity. After another international incident involving the Avengers results in collateral damage, political pressure mounts to install a system of accountability and a governing body to determine when to enlist the services of the team. The new status quo fractures the Avengers while they try to protect the world from a new and nefarious villain.

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The robot revolution has begun and Captain America is without his trusty shield.

Ultron, the unreasonably angry artificial intelligence program, has taken over the form of some battered autonomous Iron Man suits and is using them to blast apart a late-night Avengers party in Stark Tower. Just before a few carefully placed blasts hit the all-American super-soldier, he kicks up a heel, knocks a marble table into the air and uses it to block the attack.

In real life, on the Shepperton Studios set outside London, Chris Evans looks like he’s playing an invisible game of hacky sack. The massive stone table will be digitally added later. (Even though the actor is in great shape, no human foot could casually flip such an object into the air.)

Avengers: Age of Ultron filmmaker Joss Whedon is advising the other heroes to scatter, while Cobie Smulders, playing former S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Maria Hill, dives to the floor just below Cap. Whedon is puzzling over the choreography here.

He jokes that the next shot in the movie will be Hill rising up with all the plates, food, and napkins from the tabletop stuck to her body.

While they sort it out so she doesn’t enter the firefight looking like she just finished a food fight, Evans has some time to talk …

Entertainment Weekly: In the first Avengers film, Cap was the outsider still trying to figure out where he belonged. This time, he’s the leader.

Chris Evans: I think he’s trying to be. I don’t think he’s aggressively barking orders at people, but I think when you have all these powers and abilities, someone needs to steer the ship. So I think that is what he’s trying to do.

EW: The Winter Soldier really upended things for him. His old friend is still alive, maybe still out there, maybe he’s good, maybe not. Is he still grappling with all that?

Evans: That’s the tricky part about these movies. You have to kind of suspend those plotlines temporarily and find reasons to say ‘Okay, we’ll get to that in just one movie. We’ll get right back to that.’ It’s hard to kind of say with too much logic why he’s kind of putting that on the back burner. But he’s addressing the matter at hand, and right now that’s Ultron.

EW: A hero has to multitask.

Evans: Well that’s just it. You need to give a little bit of a nod to it because if you ignore it, it’s insulting the audience’s intelligence. But at the same time, the audience almost has to respect movies: ‘Look, do you guys want this? If you want The Avengers, we have to accept the fact that there’s going to be splinters in our plotlines.’

EW: I feel like Cap is the noblest of all the characters. He’s the only one who knows what it’s like to be powerless. To be on the other side of fear.

Evans: He does have a healthy understanding of what it feels like to be powerless, to be the victim. But he also has a healthy understanding of what it is to be a soldier. I think anytime you meet anyone that’s been in the military, when you fight alongside someone they become a brother. I think in a weird way he looks at his Avengers as his family at this point.

EW: Is family what he wants? A bond with a fellow fighter?

Evans: It’s certainly what he wants, but Cap puts what he wants last. That’s his M.O. And I think for so long he just refuses to bleed on people. So it’s hard to explore a guy who doesn’t want to make waves with his own personal conflict. He’s always trying to help the greater good.

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