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COLLIDER – We should all strap in for a lot of “will he, won’t he” when it comes to Chris Evans playing Captain America after the next two Avengers movies. Evans is contracted to two more Marvel films, and those films are Avengers: Infinity War and the untitled Avengers 4. Last week, he told Esquire that he was probably done playing the character after he had fulfilled his contact.

Settling in on the couch, he groans. Evans explains that he’s hurting all over because he just started his workout routine the day before to get in shape for the next two Captain America films. The movies will be shot back to back beginning in April. After that, no more red- white-and-blue costume for the thirty-five-year-old. He will have fulfilled his contract.

However, when Christina Radish spoke to Evans today at the press day for his new film Gifted, he sounded a bit different:

Are you really going to be done playing Captain America, after the next two Avengers movies?

It’s really not up to me. My contract is up. I’m not going to sit here and say, “No more.” I think Hugh Jackman has made 47 Wolverine movies, and they somehow keep getting better. It’s a character I love, and it’s a factory that really knows what they’re doing. The system is sound, over there. They make great movies. If they weren’t kicking out quality, I’d have a different opinion. But, everything Marvel does seems to be cinema gold. And like I said, I love the character. The only reason it would end is ‘cause my contract is up. After Avengers 4, my contract is done. Talk to Marvel. If we engage further, I’d be open to it. I love the character. It’s almost like high school. You certainly always look to senior year, and then, all of a sudden, senior year happens and you’re like, “I don’t know if I’m ready to go.” It’s tough thinking about not playing the guy.”

Here’s the thing: Evans is playing it smart with regards to his future as the character. On the one hand, fans like him as Cap, he’s got a good rapport with Marvel, and he likes the movies he’s making. That being said, he’s worth more today than he was when he first signed on to his six-picture deal. But Marvel could easily recast the role, not just with a different actor, but they could follow the lead of the comics and have either Bucky Barnes (Sebastian Stan) or Sam Wilson (Anthony Mackie) become the new Captain America.

Both sides have options, and so as an actor who’s going to have to negotiate for a new contract, Evans doesn’t want to go too far in either direction. He doesn’t want to say, “I will absolutely keep playing Captain American and will take payment in hugs if it means I get to stay on,” but he also doesn’t want to talk himself out of a job and say, “There’s no way in hell I’m playing Captain America again.” It could be genuine ambivalence, but it could also be smart negotiating.

Furthermore, it’s important to keep in mind that these Marvel movies take up about six months of his time. For a guy who has expressed an interest in wanting to do more directing and just as an actor who probably wants to play other kinds of characters, the thought of being tied down to one superhero can be daunting. It wouldn’t surprise me if Evans does make a deal similar to Robert Downey Jr. where he plays smaller parts in upcoming Marvel films rather than having to be at the top of the call sheet every day.

Whatever the case may be, we probably won’t know for sure until at least next year since Evans is spending most of his 2017 shooting the next two Avengers movies.

ESQUIRE – The Canadian commandos are the first to jump. Our plane reaches an altitude of about eight thousand feet; the back door opens. Although it’s a warm winter day below in rural southern California, up here, not so much. In whooshes freezing air and the cold reality that this is actually happening. Out drop the eight commandos, all in black-and-red camouflage, one after the other. For them it’s a training exercise, and Jesus, these crazy bastards are stoked. The last Canuck to exit into the nothingness is a freakishly tall stud with a crew cut and a handlebar mustache; just before he leaps, he flashes a smile our way. Yeah, yeah, we get it: You’re a badass.

Moments later, the plane’s at ten thousand feet, and the next to go are a Middle Eastern couple in their late thirties. These two can’t wait. They are ecstatic. Skydiving is clearly a thing for them. Why? I can’t help thinking. Is it like foreplay? Do they rush off to the car after landing and get it on in the parking lot? They give us the thumbs-up and they’re gone.

Just like that, we’re at 12,500 feet and it’s our turn. Me and Chris Evans, recognized throughout the universe as the star of the Marvel-comic-book-inspired Captain America and Avengers movies. The five films in the series, which began in 2011 with Captain America: The First Avenger, have grossed more than $4 billion.

The two of us, plus four crew members, are the only ones left in the back of the plane. Over the loud drone of the twin propellers, one of the crew members shouts, “Okay, who’s going first?”

Evans and I are seated on benches opposite each other. Neither of us answers. I look at him; he looks at me. I feel like I’ve swallowed a live rat. Evans is over there, all Captain America cool, smiling away.

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INSTYLE.COM – So this is a fashion story, huh?” asks Chris Evans, as he lies back on his sofa and kicks his red Timberland Earthkeepers onto the wooden coffee table in his Los Angeles home. “Well, it may be my last one. If I were the only man left on this earth, I’d be wearing sweatpants every day for the rest of my life.” The 34-year-old Boston native may not be a sartorial savant, but just a week before this interview, the scruffy Captain America stud attended the Academy Awards was looking dapper in a simple black Prada tuxedo, bow tie, and slicked-back hair.

“It was an out-of-body experience,” he says. “I grew up watching the Oscars, so being there makes me appreciate how far I’ve come.” In the early ’90s, Evans started his career as one of the dreamy guys you could romance in the board game Mystery Date. He went on an open casting call and booked the “role” of Tyler. Fast forward 20 years and the actor is headlining two major new movies: the third installment of his blockbuster Marvel series Captain America: Civil War, in theaters now, and the Marc Webb–directed family drama Gifted. The latter is a departure from his superhero filmography, but Evans, who says he practiced Buddhism since his early 20s, believes in taking on projects he connects with. “I want everything I do to come from a pure place so that I don’t become soured by the experience. I just like things to be easy in my everyday life,” he admits. “I don’t even like shaving.”

Clearly, you’re not a huge fashion guy. How would you describe your approach to style?
I try to be simple, classic, and clean. I don’t like my jeans to be too frilly, so I go with basic Levi’s and a fitted white T-shirt. I appreciate a retro vibe—a nice James Dean or Paul Newman look. It takes me about two minutes to get dressed, but then I’ll get photographed sometimes and think, Oh, s—. I look like a bum.

Do you ever accessorize?
I always prioritize function. I like Barton Perreira sunglasses because I have very weak eyes, so I’m always squinting—there you go, that’s fashiony! You can’t really go wrong with Ray-Bans either. If I’m going to get all dressed up and go to the nines, an IWC watch is nice.

How about shoes?
My favorite article of clothing is a good pair of sneakers. Solid footwear makes me feel more secure, athletic, and mobile. I’m not into labels, so I don’t care what kind of sneakers they are, as long as they’re comfortable and the laces tie. I’m not the barefoot type of guy.

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NY DAILY NEWS – As off-screen do-gooders go, Captain America takes the cake.

Actor Chris Evans, star of “Captain America: Civil War,” surprised a packed Manhattan movie theater full of young volunteers Wednesday night for a special New York Daily News/Disney charity screening of his new movie.

And he even led the audience in serenading a soon-to-be-13-year-old good Samaritan with a rousing “Happy Birthday” — while toting a superhero-themed cupcake and Captain America toys for every kid in the theater, courtesy of the movie studio.

“Knowing that the role, though demanding and though heavy with responsibility, you get that type of reaction and it’s all worth it,” Evans told the Daily News immediately after exiting the theater.

It reminded him of the time he met his idol, Hulk Hogan, and got an action figure signed as a child.

“I feel like I am those kids screaming,” he said. “Because I remember what it was like when I was a kid. When things really drove me wild.”

The screening honored a pair of charities that encourage kids to volunteer. GenerationOn, the youth services division of Points of Light, inspires, equips and mobilizes kids to improve the world through volunteer services in their communities.

“It’s really great to see someone of his standing interested in this stuff, because it makes people see what needs to be done. … Wow, Captain America believes in this? We should too,” said Eden Duncan-Smith, a 16-year-old volunteer with Generation On.

CelebrateU, founded by a pair of teens, organizes birthday parties for less-fortunate kids in shelters.

“We were really excited to come to the movie in the first place, and we had no idea he was going to be there,” said Chase Cauder, 16, cofounder of CelebrateU. “And when he came out we were like wow.”

On Wednesday, the tables were turned on one of that organization’s volunteers. Archie Silverstein, who turns 13 this month, was himself feted. He had recently donated his Bar Mitzvah gift money to the charity.

“It was pretty awesome to see a guy I admire so much come out of nowhere and wish me a happy birthday. It was so insane. I had no idea,” said Silverstein.

In “Captain America: Civil War,” opening late Thursday, Evans reprises his role as the star-spangled hero, facing off against his most dangerous foe — his old Avengers teammate Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) — over a push to bring superheroes under the government’s control.

But before the lights dimmed, Evans put the spotlight on the assembled kids, thanking them for helping to make the world a better place without CGI superpowers or stunt doubles.

“It’s a cool thing to think you might have a place in one of their chapters of their childhood,” said Evans.

ROLLING STONES – There are black helicopters buzzing over Hollywood Boulevard. The LAPD has shut down traffic in both directions. Thousands of civilians are amassed on the sidewalk. If this were a comic- book movie, now would be the time when the sky opens up and the alien mothership comes swooping in, space guns blazing. But because it’s just the premiere of a comic-book movie – Marvel’s Captain America: Civil War, opening this month – all the hubbub merely presages the arrival of the man of the hour, the leader of the Avengers, Cap himself: 34-year-old Chris Evans, flashing an action figure smile as he steps out of a blue Audi sports car and onto the red carpet.

The sports car was not Evans’ idea. Audi is a big sponsor of Captain America: Civil War, and the product placement apparently extends to the premiere, where he and his co-star/antagonist in the film, Robert Downey Jr., have been asked to arrive in matching Audi R8s – red for Downey’s Iron Man, blue for Evans’ Cap. Up until then, Evans was having a stress-free evening, pre-partying at his home in the Hollywood Hills with his mom and brother and some buddies from back home in Boston, getting loose before his big night. But when he got to the theater and had to do the car thing – that’s when the anxiety kicked in.

“It’s a little nerve-racking,” Evans says two days later. “You’re in the SUV with your family, your people. And then you have to pull over in some weird parking lot and do the swap. There’s security and all these people. All of a sudden you’re out of your comfort zone. It’s strange. The little things that can tip you over.”

“It’s funny,” says Scarlett Johansson, a frequent Captain America and Avengers co-star who’s known Evans since she was 17. “He’s extremely easygoing, he loves to hang out, he loves to be around people. But whenever we do a premiere, or he has to be in the fray in some work-related context, he’s terrified.” Downey told something similar to Jimmy Kimmel the night after the premiere: “Chris Evans is such a nervous Nellie,” he said. “We’re supposed to drive in in the Audis, and he’s like, ‘Bro, I don’t know – should you go first, or I should go first?’ I was like, ‘Man up, dude!'” (Later, to Rolling Stone, he also says Evans had to excuse himself for a cigarette.)

You’d think this stuff would be easy for Evans by now. He’s one of the biggest names in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, the sprawling, $8 billion Disney-owned enterprise that includes his three Captain America films; the Iron Man, Thor and Hulk franchises; and the all-star Avengers team-ups, two of the top-grossing movies of all time. Shouldn’t he be comfortable with a few cameras and fans? But to hear Evans tell it, he’s one of the least-comfortable movie stars around. The acting part is fine; it’s everything else he can’t handle.

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USA TODAY – ATLANTA — Tony Stark is really irked, and it’s not just because someone has left used coffee grounds in the official Avengers coffeemaker.

The ultra-modern Porsche building outside downtown Atlanta has been turned into the headquarters of Earth’s mightiest heroes on the set of the new Marvel movie Captain America: Civil War (in theaters Friday), and Robert Downey Jr.’s playboy billionaire philanthropist, who’s huffy about his state-of-the-art kitchen being “a bed-and-breakfast for a biker gang,” has one serious headache that a cup of joe won’t fix.

His team has just been told that 117 countries have ratified the Sokovia Accords, which will put the Avengers under a United Nations oversight committee in just a few days’ time. It’s the result of one too many global disasters, and the cracks in this superhero family are starting to show even in the luxury digs.

At least all that internal strife won’t have an adverse effect on the group’s box-office power. The 13th film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Civil War was voted the most anticipated summer movie in a recent survey by Fandango, and according to the ticket-buying site, the film is outselling every other Marvel effort in advance sales. “The guaranteed amount of repeat viewing will propel the film to what I believe will be one of the top opening weekends of all time and off-the-charts long-term playability around the world,” says comScore senior media analyst Paul Dergarabedian.

Over the successful course of three solo Iron Man films and two Avengers movies, Tony Stark has seen some seriously bad stuff and is OK with being put in check. He tells the team of a bright young man who wanted to spend the summer building sustainable homes in Sokovia, but “we dropped a building on him” when the Avengers battled the evil robot Ultron in the fictional European country (see: last year’s Avengers: Age of Ultron). “If we have no boundaries,” Stark figures, “we’re just as bad as the bad guys.”

This isn’t the kind of freedom Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) has been fighting for as Captain America since World War II, and he lets his disapproval be known. “I’m not saying we’re perfect,” he says. “But the safest hands are still our own.”

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EW.COM – The crew called their big scene the “Splash Page.” That’s the comic-book term for a full-spread illustration that either opens a story or marks its climax.

For Captain America: Civil War, this was the moment they filmed an epic throwdown between two teams of heroes: the forces of Chris Evans’ red, white, and blue soldier on one side, clashing against the warriors aligned with Robert Downey Jr.’s Iron Man on the other.

The 2006-07 Marvel Comics series that inspired the movie, which opens May 6, explores the same enduring question of freedom versus safety. In the Mark Millar-scripted comics, hero turned against hero as some resisted government control of their identities and abilities while others sought compliance and regulation for the greater good. Captain America stood for independence from government control, while Iron Man worked to legislate and enforce responsibility on those with “enhanced abilities.”

“In most of the movies, there’s no question who we should be siding with,” Evans says during a break between shots. “We all agree Nazis are bad, aliens from space are bad. But this movie’s the first time where you really have two points of view. There’s really no wrong answer here and it’s just a matter of who we are as men: Tony Stark and myself. Which side of the aisle do we come down on? So it’s hard for [Cap]. It becomes a question of morality and I don’t think he’s ever been so uncertain with what right and wrong is.”

In this film, the new Avengers — seen assembling at the end of Age of Ultron — take on an old enemy: Frank Grillo’s Crossbones, last spotted getting a building dropped on his skull in 2013’s Captain America: The Winter Soldier. But… the takedown goes wrong. A lot of people die. A lot of innocent ones.

After all the chaos and catastrophe witnessed in the previous films, the world finally has had enough. Government officials from around the globe assemble to enact accords that would clamp down on those with super-human skills. One man helping form the new laws is a young leader named T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) from the fictional African nation of Wakanda, who has a secret identity himself — the long awaited Black Panther.

But Cap has seen too much corrupt authority in his (unnaturally) long life. He ain’t marching anymore.

On this already broiling July morning in Fayetteville, Georgia, Evans is sweating through his Cap mask as he shoots the Splash Page — this culmination of the conflict over the accords.

He’s standing at the end of a flat expanse of asphalt, ringed with two-story green tarps that will allow special-effects artists to transform this Pinewood Studios parking lot into a tarmac at Leipzig/Halle International Airport.

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THEWRAP.COM – Tate Taylor is directing the movie, which will star Emily Blunt, Rebecca Ferguson and Haley Bennett

Comic book movie stars Chris Evans and Jared Leto are being sought to play the male leads in “The Girl on the Train” at DreamWorks, TheWrap has learned.

Emily Blunt, Rebecca Ferguson and Haley Bennett are set to star in Tate Taylor‘s adaptation of Paula Hawkins’ bestselling book.
Both actors would have to overcome major scheduling obstacles, but if their deals make, Evans would play Ferguson’s husband, Tom, while Leto would play Bennett’s husband, Scott.

Blunt stars as Rachel, who fantasizes during her daily commute about the seemingly perfect couple who live in a house that her train passes every day, until she sees something shocking happen there one morning and becomes entangled in the mystery that unfolds.
Ferguson will play Anna, who is married to Rachel’s ex-husband (Evans). Bennett will play Megan, a married neighbor who goes missing.

Erin Cressida Wilson wrote the script for the film, which is being produced by Marc Platt. Executive producers include Jared LeBoff and Celia Costas.

Leto will soon be seen as the Joker in “Suicide Squad,” while Evans will reprise his titular role in “Captain America: Civil War.”

People.com – Beneath the muscles and the machismo of Captain America, there’s a softer side to Chris Evans – at least according to the actor himself.

“I’m a pretty romantic guy,” Evans, 34, told PEOPLE at the premiere of his directorial debut, Before We Go, in Hollywood on Wednesday night.

“I don’t necessarily limit the notion of romance to people, though. I think I have a romantic relationship to art, to music, to nature,” added Evans.

With that in mind, he also revealed the most romantic thing he’s ever done for someone – even if that someone was himself: “I went camping once for three weeks by myself, which is very romantic,” he told reporters. “It’s true. It was very romantic, but maybe not in the conventional sense.”

The first-time director also stars in the film as a trumpet player who spends one night with a stranger who may or may not be the love of his life.

“It’s two people who are somewhat damaged and find some peace in the arms of a stranger. I think that sometimes that’s the best place to go,” Evans said. “Sometimes you can really spill your guts when you’re talking to someone who has no judgment.”

Through the years, Evans has been linked to many actresses, including Jessica Biel, Minka Kelly, Sandra Bullock and, most recently, Lily Collins. But hints that right now he’s simply married to his movie.

“Oh God, I couldn’t even think about my own life,” said Evans when asked if he’s ready to stop playing the field and settle down. “I had no life during this movie. This movie was all about the movie and that was it.”

The film about a man (Evans) who tries to raise the brilliant young daughter of his dead sister will shoot in the fall.

Chris Evans has signed on to star in Marc Webb’s next directorial outing, Gifted.

The Fox Searchlight film about a man (Evans) who tries to raise the brilliant young daughter of his dead sister will shoot in the fall.

Tom Flynn (Highboys and Lowboys) wrote the screenplay. FilmNation is selling international rights to the film.

Gifted marks Webb’s first film since 2014’s The Amazing Spider-Man 2, which did not receive a third outing after disappointing reviews and so-so box-office. He previously made the critically acclaimed (500) Days of Summer for Searchlight.

Evans and Webb are repped by CAA.

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