VANITY FAIR – On a sweltering October weekend, the largest-ever group of Marvel superheroes and friends gathered just outside of Atlanta for a top-secret assignment. Eighty-three of the famous faces who have brought Marvel’s comic-book characters to life over the past decade mixed and mingled—Mark Ruffalo, who plays the Hulk, bonded with Vin Diesel, the voice of Groot, the monosyllabic sapling from Guardians of the Galaxy. Angela Bassett, mother to Chadwick Boseman’s Black Panther, flew through hurricane-like conditions to report for duty alongside Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson, Gwyneth Paltrow, Brie Larson, Paul Rudd, Jeremy Renner, Laurence Fishburne, and Stan Lee, the celebrated comic-book writer and co-creator of Iron Man, Spider-Man, Doctor Strange, the Fantastic Four, and the X-Men.

Their mission: to strike a heroic pose to commemorate 10 years of unprecedented moviemaking success. Marvel Studios, which kicked things off with Iron Man in 2008, has released 17 films that collectively have grossed more than $13 billion at the global box office; 5 more movies are due out in the next two years. The sprawling franchise has resuscitated careers (Downey), has minted new stars (Tom Hiddleston), and increasingly attracts an impressive range of A-list talent, from art-house favorites (Benedict Cumberbatch and Tilda Swinton in Doctor Strange) to Hollywood icons (Anthony Hopkins and Robert Redford) to at least three handsome guys named Chris (Hemsworth, Evans, and Pratt). The wattage at the photo shoot was so high that Ant-Man star Michael Douglas—Michael Douglas!—was collecting autographs. (Photographer Jason Bell shot Vanity Fair’s own Marvel portfolio shortly afterward.)

But it wasn’t Samuel L. Jackson’s Nick Fury or even Chris Evans’s Captain America who assembled Earth’s mightiest heroes. They came for Kevin Feige, the unassuming man in a black baseball cap who took Marvel Studios from an underdog endeavor with a roster of B-list characters to a cinematic empire that is the envy of every other studio in town. Feige’s innovative, comic-book-based approach to blockbuster moviemaking—having heroes from one film bleed into the next—has changed not only the way movies are made but also pop culture at large. Fans can’t get enough of a world where space-hopping Guardians of the Galaxy might turn up alongside earthbound Avengers, or Doctor Strange and Black Panther could cross paths via a mind-bending rift in the space-time continuum. Other studios, most notably Warner Bros., with the Justice League, have tried to create their own web of interconnected characters. Why have so many failed to achieve Marvel’s heights? “Simple,” said Joe Russo, co-director of Avengers 3 and 4. “They don’t have a Kevin.”

Before Feige, Marvel Studios wasn’t even making its own films. Created in 1993 as Marvel Films, the movie arm of the comics company simply licensed its characters to other studios, earning most of its money from merchandise sales. (The popular 2002 Sam Raimi-directed Spider-Man movie, for example, was made by Sony’s Columbia Pictures.) Feige was part of the team that pushed for the studio to take full creative control of its library of beloved characters, a risky move at the time. “For us old-timers—me and Robert [Downey] and Gwyneth [Paltrow] and Kevin—it felt like we were the upper-classmen,” Jon Favreau, director of the first two Iron Man movies, told me shortly after the photo shoot. “We were emotional . . . thinking about how precarious it all felt in the beginning.”

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RTE – Avengers star Chris Evans has told RTÉ Entertainment that he does not know if he would be interested in reprising his superhero role as Captain America ten years down the line for a gritty movie in the vein of Hugh Jackman’s recent X-Men spin-off Logan.

Evans, who is back on Irish cinema screens from this weekend in the family drama Gifted, is due to finish up his time in the Marvel Cinematic Universe with the two-part Avengers: Infinity War in April 2018 and April 2019.

Asked by RTÉ Entertainment if returning as an older, wearier Captain America was part of his career plan, Evans admitted that it was “tough to say for sure”.

“I mean, I love the character,” he continued. “I love my time in the Marvel world. And Marvel is certainly the ‘Midas touch machine’ – everything they do is quality.

“So I would never question whether or not it would be of a calibre that I would be interested in. My creative appetites kind of change with the tides, so who knows what I’ll be feeling down the road.”

Gifted has been described as Kramer-vs-Kramer-meets-Good Will Hunting and follows Evans’ odd job man Frank as he battles to raise pint-sized genius Mary (Mckenna Grace) as a normal child.

When put to Evans that the film feels very much like an actor looking to life after Marvel, he replied: “That’s never the intention. I don’t really approach my career in terms of how I’m perceived or what people will expect of me. I follow my creative appetite – whatever I feel like pursuing that’s what I pursue.”

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RADIO TIMES – In a world of leaks, huge anticipation and rabid online fanbases it’s perhaps unsurprising that Captain America star Chris Evans likes to keep a lid on his upcoming appearances in Marvel’s superhero movie universe, with the US star remaining tight-lipped about his role in Avengers: Infinity War and other Marvel movies.

“I think Marvel has like a sniper on me at all times,” Evans told RadioTimes.com. “You know that.

“You’ve done enough of these interviews to know that I can’t answer anything having to do with Marvel!”

However, there was one thing Evans WAS willing to admit – just how little he knew about one of the films he’d be appearing in soon, specifically Tom Holland-starring reboot Spider-Man: Homecoming.

You see, for months many fans have assumed that Evans’ Captain America would play a decent-sized role in the upcoming movie, with the actor said to have been filming with Iron Man star Robert Downey Jr in Atlanta and a trailer teasing his appearance by including a pre-recorded school gym class video featuring the WWII hero.

But now Evans has told us that we won’t be seeing Steve Rogers fight villains or lay down some wisdom for Peter Parker in Spider-Man: Homecoming after all – because he actually only filmed that video cameo and not much else.

“Spider-Man? I have no idea what it’s about,” Evans said. “I really don’t. I didn’t read the script, I did that [cameo]…recently!

“I have literally NO idea what it’s about. I have no idea.”

Now of course it could be that Evans is lying and Captain America will play a more substantial role in the new film – but given how prominent Downey Jr’s Tony Stark has been in recent trailers, it’s looking increasingly likely that Cap is tapped out for this one.

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BROADWAY.COM – A revival of Kenneth Lonergan’s Lobby Hero and a new production of Young Jean Lee’s Straight White Men will be the first two productions to play Broadway’s Helen Hayes Theatre under the ownership of the nonprofit Second Stage Theatre. Second Stage purchased the historic Hayes in 2015.

Michael Cera will play Jeff and Chris Evans will play Bill in Lobby Hero, directed by Trip Cullman, set to begin performances in March 2018. Straight White Men, directed by Tony winner Anna D. Shapiro, will begin its run in July 2018. Exact dates for both productions will be announced.

In Lobby Hero, a young security guard (Cera) with big ambitions clashes with his stern boss (Evans), an intense rookie cop and her unpredictable partner. Lobby Hero first debuted off-Broadway with Playwrights Horizons for a run from February 16-March 25, 2001. Lonergan, whose history with Second Stage includes acclaimed original productions of This Is Our Youth (Cera appeared in a 2014 Broadway revival of the play) and The Waverly Gallery, won the 2017 Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for Manchester by the Sea.

In Straight White Men, it’s Christmas Eve, and Ed has gathered his three adult sons to celebrate with matching pajamas, trash-talking, and Chinese takeout. But when a question they can’t answer interrupts their holiday cheer, they are forced to confront their own identities. Straight White Men received an off-Broadway production directed by Lee at the Public Theater from November 7-December 14, 2014. With its opening at the Helen Hayes Theatre, Lee becomes Broadway’s Asian-American female playwright. Her other plays include Church and We’re Gonna Die.

Second Stage will continue to produce at its off-Broadway home, the Tony Kiser Theater. The season will include the New York premiere of Tracy Letts’s Mary Page Marlowe in June of 2018. Letts’ play Man from Nebraska, concluded a recent run at Second Stage. The director of Mary Page Marlowe will be announced at a later date. Mary Page Marlowe is described as a seemingly ordinary accountant from Ohio who has experienced pain and joy, success and failure.

Second Stage has also announced the co-commission of playwrights with Los Angeles’s Center Theatre Group. Plays by these scribes will begin at CTG and then transfer to New York. These commissioned playwrights will be Young Jean Lee, Tony nominee Jon Robin Baitz, Will Eno, Tony winner Lisa Kron, and Pulitzer winners Lynn Nottage and Paula Vogel (who are both currently represented on Broadway with Sweat and Indecent, respectively). Second Stage will also co-commission a new work from Bess Wohl for Broadway.

The upcoming Second Stage off-Broadway season will also include the previously announced revival of Harvey Fierstein’s Torch Song, directed by Moisés Kaufman. Performances will begin in September 2017.

E ONLINE – Chris Evans’ plan to be a dad one day isn’t the only thing he revealed to E! News when we sat down with him last week to talk about his new movie Gifted.

Here are five more things we learned about the hunky actor that ya gotta know.

1. Young Love: Evans said he had at least three celebrity crushes when he was a kid. “Elisabeth Shue from Adventures of Babysitting and Karate Kid!…Lori Loughlin was a big one. Come on, who didn’t love Lori Loughlin? She hasn’t aged at all. Sandra Bullock was a big one too…like when I was like in seventh or eight grade.”

2. Song & Dance: Evans not only knows how to tap dance (just ask any of his co-stars, who frequently comment on his awesome dancing skills), but he’d love to star in a musical. “I’m looking to find one,” he said, adding, “I love Gene Kelly, he was great. Wouldn’t it be great to do a [Gene Kelly] biopic or something like that?”

Or Guys & Dolls! “That would be great, too,” Evans said. “I did that in high school.”

3. Be Our Guest: Evans hasn’t seen the new Beauty and the Beast yet, but he will. “I am a Disney buff,” said Evans.

4. It’s Elementary: Evans’ favorite subject in school was math. “I probably didn’t like English too much,” he said. “I hate spelling and grammar.” (He stars in Gifted as a boat mechanic who is raising his six-year-old math prodigy niece.)

5. Super Power: Evans’ official reign as Captain America is set to end after the third and fourth Avengers movies. “After that my contract is done so it’s out of my hands,” he said. However, he may not be ready to put down that shield: “I have been doing this for so long, it’s tough to think about not doing it. For almost a decade now there has always been one around the corner. I would be open to it. I love playing that guy.”

Gifted is in theaters on April 7.

COLLIDER – We should all strap in for a lot of “will he, won’t he” when it comes to Chris Evans playing Captain America after the next two Avengers movies. Evans is contracted to two more Marvel films, and those films are Avengers: Infinity War and the untitled Avengers 4. Last week, he told Esquire that he was probably done playing the character after he had fulfilled his contact.

Settling in on the couch, he groans. Evans explains that he’s hurting all over because he just started his workout routine the day before to get in shape for the next two Captain America films. The movies will be shot back to back beginning in April. After that, no more red- white-and-blue costume for the thirty-five-year-old. He will have fulfilled his contract.

However, when Christina Radish spoke to Evans today at the press day for his new film Gifted, he sounded a bit different:

Are you really going to be done playing Captain America, after the next two Avengers movies?

It’s really not up to me. My contract is up. I’m not going to sit here and say, “No more.” I think Hugh Jackman has made 47 Wolverine movies, and they somehow keep getting better. It’s a character I love, and it’s a factory that really knows what they’re doing. The system is sound, over there. They make great movies. If they weren’t kicking out quality, I’d have a different opinion. But, everything Marvel does seems to be cinema gold. And like I said, I love the character. The only reason it would end is ‘cause my contract is up. After Avengers 4, my contract is done. Talk to Marvel. If we engage further, I’d be open to it. I love the character. It’s almost like high school. You certainly always look to senior year, and then, all of a sudden, senior year happens and you’re like, “I don’t know if I’m ready to go.” It’s tough thinking about not playing the guy.”

Here’s the thing: Evans is playing it smart with regards to his future as the character. On the one hand, fans like him as Cap, he’s got a good rapport with Marvel, and he likes the movies he’s making. That being said, he’s worth more today than he was when he first signed on to his six-picture deal. But Marvel could easily recast the role, not just with a different actor, but they could follow the lead of the comics and have either Bucky Barnes (Sebastian Stan) or Sam Wilson (Anthony Mackie) become the new Captain America.

Both sides have options, and so as an actor who’s going to have to negotiate for a new contract, Evans doesn’t want to go too far in either direction. He doesn’t want to say, “I will absolutely keep playing Captain American and will take payment in hugs if it means I get to stay on,” but he also doesn’t want to talk himself out of a job and say, “There’s no way in hell I’m playing Captain America again.” It could be genuine ambivalence, but it could also be smart negotiating.

Furthermore, it’s important to keep in mind that these Marvel movies take up about six months of his time. For a guy who has expressed an interest in wanting to do more directing and just as an actor who probably wants to play other kinds of characters, the thought of being tied down to one superhero can be daunting. It wouldn’t surprise me if Evans does make a deal similar to Robert Downey Jr. where he plays smaller parts in upcoming Marvel films rather than having to be at the top of the call sheet every day.

Whatever the case may be, we probably won’t know for sure until at least next year since Evans is spending most of his 2017 shooting the next two Avengers movies.

ESQUIRE – The Canadian commandos are the first to jump. Our plane reaches an altitude of about eight thousand feet; the back door opens. Although it’s a warm winter day below in rural southern California, up here, not so much. In whooshes freezing air and the cold reality that this is actually happening. Out drop the eight commandos, all in black-and-red camouflage, one after the other. For them it’s a training exercise, and Jesus, these crazy bastards are stoked. The last Canuck to exit into the nothingness is a freakishly tall stud with a crew cut and a handlebar mustache; just before he leaps, he flashes a smile our way. Yeah, yeah, we get it: You’re a badass.

Moments later, the plane’s at ten thousand feet, and the next to go are a Middle Eastern couple in their late thirties. These two can’t wait. They are ecstatic. Skydiving is clearly a thing for them. Why? I can’t help thinking. Is it like foreplay? Do they rush off to the car after landing and get it on in the parking lot? They give us the thumbs-up and they’re gone.

Just like that, we’re at 12,500 feet and it’s our turn. Me and Chris Evans, recognized throughout the universe as the star of the Marvel-comic-book-inspired Captain America and Avengers movies. The five films in the series, which began in 2011 with Captain America: The First Avenger, have grossed more than $4 billion.

The two of us, plus four crew members, are the only ones left in the back of the plane. Over the loud drone of the twin propellers, one of the crew members shouts, “Okay, who’s going first?”

Evans and I are seated on benches opposite each other. Neither of us answers. I look at him; he looks at me. I feel like I’ve swallowed a live rat. Evans is over there, all Captain America cool, smiling away.

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INSTYLE.COM – So this is a fashion story, huh?” asks Chris Evans, as he lies back on his sofa and kicks his red Timberland Earthkeepers onto the wooden coffee table in his Los Angeles home. “Well, it may be my last one. If I were the only man left on this earth, I’d be wearing sweatpants every day for the rest of my life.” The 34-year-old Boston native may not be a sartorial savant, but just a week before this interview, the scruffy Captain America stud attended the Academy Awards was looking dapper in a simple black Prada tuxedo, bow tie, and slicked-back hair.

“It was an out-of-body experience,” he says. “I grew up watching the Oscars, so being there makes me appreciate how far I’ve come.” In the early ’90s, Evans started his career as one of the dreamy guys you could romance in the board game Mystery Date. He went on an open casting call and booked the “role” of Tyler. Fast forward 20 years and the actor is headlining two major new movies: the third installment of his blockbuster Marvel series Captain America: Civil War, in theaters now, and the Marc Webb–directed family drama Gifted. The latter is a departure from his superhero filmography, but Evans, who says he practiced Buddhism since his early 20s, believes in taking on projects he connects with. “I want everything I do to come from a pure place so that I don’t become soured by the experience. I just like things to be easy in my everyday life,” he admits. “I don’t even like shaving.”

Clearly, you’re not a huge fashion guy. How would you describe your approach to style?
I try to be simple, classic, and clean. I don’t like my jeans to be too frilly, so I go with basic Levi’s and a fitted white T-shirt. I appreciate a retro vibe—a nice James Dean or Paul Newman look. It takes me about two minutes to get dressed, but then I’ll get photographed sometimes and think, Oh, s—. I look like a bum.

Do you ever accessorize?
I always prioritize function. I like Barton Perreira sunglasses because I have very weak eyes, so I’m always squinting—there you go, that’s fashiony! You can’t really go wrong with Ray-Bans either. If I’m going to get all dressed up and go to the nines, an IWC watch is nice.

How about shoes?
My favorite article of clothing is a good pair of sneakers. Solid footwear makes me feel more secure, athletic, and mobile. I’m not into labels, so I don’t care what kind of sneakers they are, as long as they’re comfortable and the laces tie. I’m not the barefoot type of guy.

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NY DAILY NEWS – As off-screen do-gooders go, Captain America takes the cake.

Actor Chris Evans, star of “Captain America: Civil War,” surprised a packed Manhattan movie theater full of young volunteers Wednesday night for a special New York Daily News/Disney charity screening of his new movie.

And he even led the audience in serenading a soon-to-be-13-year-old good Samaritan with a rousing “Happy Birthday” — while toting a superhero-themed cupcake and Captain America toys for every kid in the theater, courtesy of the movie studio.

“Knowing that the role, though demanding and though heavy with responsibility, you get that type of reaction and it’s all worth it,” Evans told the Daily News immediately after exiting the theater.

It reminded him of the time he met his idol, Hulk Hogan, and got an action figure signed as a child.

“I feel like I am those kids screaming,” he said. “Because I remember what it was like when I was a kid. When things really drove me wild.”

The screening honored a pair of charities that encourage kids to volunteer. GenerationOn, the youth services division of Points of Light, inspires, equips and mobilizes kids to improve the world through volunteer services in their communities.

“It’s really great to see someone of his standing interested in this stuff, because it makes people see what needs to be done. … Wow, Captain America believes in this? We should too,” said Eden Duncan-Smith, a 16-year-old volunteer with Generation On.

CelebrateU, founded by a pair of teens, organizes birthday parties for less-fortunate kids in shelters.

“We were really excited to come to the movie in the first place, and we had no idea he was going to be there,” said Chase Cauder, 16, cofounder of CelebrateU. “And when he came out we were like wow.”

On Wednesday, the tables were turned on one of that organization’s volunteers. Archie Silverstein, who turns 13 this month, was himself feted. He had recently donated his Bar Mitzvah gift money to the charity.

“It was pretty awesome to see a guy I admire so much come out of nowhere and wish me a happy birthday. It was so insane. I had no idea,” said Silverstein.

In “Captain America: Civil War,” opening late Thursday, Evans reprises his role as the star-spangled hero, facing off against his most dangerous foe — his old Avengers teammate Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) — over a push to bring superheroes under the government’s control.

But before the lights dimmed, Evans put the spotlight on the assembled kids, thanking them for helping to make the world a better place without CGI superpowers or stunt doubles.

“It’s a cool thing to think you might have a place in one of their chapters of their childhood,” said Evans.

ROLLING STONES – There are black helicopters buzzing over Hollywood Boulevard. The LAPD has shut down traffic in both directions. Thousands of civilians are amassed on the sidewalk. If this were a comic- book movie, now would be the time when the sky opens up and the alien mothership comes swooping in, space guns blazing. But because it’s just the premiere of a comic-book movie – Marvel’s Captain America: Civil War, opening this month – all the hubbub merely presages the arrival of the man of the hour, the leader of the Avengers, Cap himself: 34-year-old Chris Evans, flashing an action figure smile as he steps out of a blue Audi sports car and onto the red carpet.

The sports car was not Evans’ idea. Audi is a big sponsor of Captain America: Civil War, and the product placement apparently extends to the premiere, where he and his co-star/antagonist in the film, Robert Downey Jr., have been asked to arrive in matching Audi R8s – red for Downey’s Iron Man, blue for Evans’ Cap. Up until then, Evans was having a stress-free evening, pre-partying at his home in the Hollywood Hills with his mom and brother and some buddies from back home in Boston, getting loose before his big night. But when he got to the theater and had to do the car thing – that’s when the anxiety kicked in.

“It’s a little nerve-racking,” Evans says two days later. “You’re in the SUV with your family, your people. And then you have to pull over in some weird parking lot and do the swap. There’s security and all these people. All of a sudden you’re out of your comfort zone. It’s strange. The little things that can tip you over.”

“It’s funny,” says Scarlett Johansson, a frequent Captain America and Avengers co-star who’s known Evans since she was 17. “He’s extremely easygoing, he loves to hang out, he loves to be around people. But whenever we do a premiere, or he has to be in the fray in some work-related context, he’s terrified.” Downey told something similar to Jimmy Kimmel the night after the premiere: “Chris Evans is such a nervous Nellie,” he said. “We’re supposed to drive in in the Audis, and he’s like, ‘Bro, I don’t know – should you go first, or I should go first?’ I was like, ‘Man up, dude!'” (Later, to Rolling Stone, he also says Evans had to excuse himself for a cigarette.)

You’d think this stuff would be easy for Evans by now. He’s one of the biggest names in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, the sprawling, $8 billion Disney-owned enterprise that includes his three Captain America films; the Iron Man, Thor and Hulk franchises; and the all-star Avengers team-ups, two of the top-grossing movies of all time. Shouldn’t he be comfortable with a few cameras and fans? But to hear Evans tell it, he’s one of the least-comfortable movie stars around. The acting part is fine; it’s everything else he can’t handle.

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